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“I’m out there every day, and mostly every night,” says Atkins, who has been catching fat shrimp, oysters and mullet since he was a child. But now the warmer waters are sharply affecting the fishing that has been not only a tradition, but central to the existence of the African American community descended from enslaved West Africans that has lived on the coast in the Lowcountry for four centuries.

https://www.theroot.com/gullah-geechee-community-hear-us-on-climate-change-1835038198